Rugby Book Review – World Rugby Records 2012

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The 191-strong scrum at Burnham-on-Sea, a record attempt made in aid of Breakthrough Breast CancerEverbody’s at it – and we’re not talking Ryan Giggs, writes Rugby World deputy editor Alan Pearey. Last December BBC Sport and Red Bee Media arranged for 68 people to ‘pack down’ at Richmond for a stunt that produced a Guinness World Record for the world’s biggest scrum.In April, Gullivers Sports Travel and Burnham-on-Sea RFC got 191 adults scrumming down and while the footage was being assessed by the Guinness arbiters, along came the party-pooping HSBC Waratahs, players and staff setting a new mark of 197 in Sydney on 8 June. Who’s next?The records in Carlton’s World Rugby Records 2012 are more mundane but harder to achieve. Editor Chris Hawkes has divided the book into eight parts, separating countries from tournaments and throwing in sevens and women’s rugby too. It’s a bit overwritten but, at 224 colour pages, can’t fail to appeal to younger fans; the publishers describe it as a book someone might buy their grandson.You need to forage to find the more interesting stats, such as: Costa Rica have gone the most number of games (11) without a first International win, Italy have had the most Test red cards (ten) out of the 106 issued, and Portugal’s Goncalo Malheiro has twice done a Jannie de Beer – five drop-goals in a match.And for all those ‘one-cap wonders’ out there, you aren’t alone: 22% of the 14,737 players to have played international rugby never got a second chance.Rugby World readers can buy this book for just £15, including free P&P in the UK. Ring 0844 576 8122 and quote the promotional code AD125. Offer ends 5 August.We also have six copies to give away. For a chance to win one, tell us:Which Australian is the world’s most-capped player? Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visitcenter_img Email your answer by Friday 12 August to [email protected] Please give a phone number.RW RATING 4/5BUY IT AT:  amazon.co.uk RRP:  £19.99   PUBLISHED BY:  Carlton BooksGot a rugby book or DVD you’d like us to review in the Armchair Zone? Email [email protected] article appeared in the August 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine. Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UKlast_img read more

Rugby World TV: Six Nations round 4 preview

first_imgThanks to Tom Macleod and We Are Iris. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS THE TEAMS have changed and, if they’re not careful, some coaches could be for the chop if they don’t get a win in this weekend’s RBS 6 Nations! In this episode of Rugby World TV, we preview Scotland v Wales, Ireland v France and England v Italy – and predict our winners. Have we got it right? Let us know on Facebook Rugby World Magazine and Twitter @Rugbyworldmag.last_img

Dubliner the Hart-beat of Grenoble

first_imgCheck out the highlights from Racing Métro v Grenoble below! All smiles: Grenoble celebrate victory over Toulon before defeating Johnny Sexton’s Racing Métro in OctoberBy Gavin Mortimer AN OSCAR for James Hart, but this one came with no tears, tantrum or tedious acceptance speech. The Oscar given to the 22-year-old Grenoble scrum-half was from Midi Olympique, the French rugby newspaper voting him his Player of the Week in the last round of the Top 14 before the tournament took a European break.It was an accolade well merited. Hart scored 16 points for Grenoble in their 22-20 defeat of Racing Métro, a victory all the more astonishing as the mountain men won away in Paris. No one was happier for the Irish-born Hart than Bernard Jackman, the Grenoble defence coach, whose association with the scrum-half goes back a decade to Clontarf.Hart of gold: James was brought up in Dublin“In all the years I’ve been involved in rugby I’ve never seen anyone work as hard as James does,” says Jackman, the former Connacht, Leinster and Ireland hooker. “I remember seeing him with a bag of balls when he was about 13, practising, practising. A lot of people thought he was crazy, just chasing a forlorn dream, but that work ethic has got him where he is today.”Hart is a driven individual, a man who trains meticulously, doesn’t drink and, according to Jackman, has about every Jonny Wilkinson training manual going. A psychologist might speculate that Hart’s inner tougher comes from the loss of his father when he was on the cusp of adolescence, a shattering experience from which he emerged all the stronger.Hart’s father was a proud Irishman, his mother, Patricia, is a proud Frenchwoman from Toulouse, and a tough one at that. “I have such huge respect for my mum,” says Hart. “When my dad passed away she went back to work to the look after the three of us (Hart has two sisters). And I was pretty hard to handle as a kid but she did a great job. It was she who taught me that in life if you want something, you must go and get it.”So that’s what Hart did with his rugby. Though he had a stint with Leinster Under 20s, that was about as good as it got in Ireland. So he returned to Clontarf and eventually got a call from Jackman inviting him to the Grenoble youth academy. Why not? thought Hart. He could speak the language, he knew the culture and so off he went. “The whole French approach is different,” explains Hart, who came off the bench in Grenoble’s Amlin cup defeat to Bayonne last week. “People are emotional. They scream and shout before a game and that can be a shock if you’re not used to it. But I know how the French react and that’s been a great help.”Like many French scrum-halves, Hart has played a bit at 10, but Jackman says his game is very much in the Irish style, despite the fact he’s a goal-kicking No 9. “He’s more game management-orientated. His natural instinct is tactical.” Hart agrees but adds that his style is evolving at Grenoble. “In Ireland I was more of a passing nine but I’m taking it on more in France, helped by the fact my speed and vision have really come on at Grenoble.”Racing can vouch for that, Jonathan Sexton in particular, who probably didn’t expect to see a 22-year-old unknown get top billing. Hart had hoped to have a chat with Sexton after the Racing game but the big man wasn’t in the mood for banter after such an ignominious defeat. Not to worry, he found Ronan O’Gara much more approachable and even got the Racing kicking coach to pose for a photo. “That was a big thrill,” says Hart. “I’ve admired Ronan for a long time so to have him say he was very impressed with my kicking was great.”Hart found out about his ‘Oscar’ on the Monday after the game. The Grenoble squad were off on a team-bonding day and someone opened his copy of Midi Olympique and there was Hart, singled out as the star of the week. Needless to say his mates all had a good laugh, bowing down before the new star among them.Jackman is confident Hart can handle his new found fame. In the days following his Oscar he did a raft of interviews for the Irish media and handled each one like a seasoned pro. One question that kept cropping up was his allegiance? If given the chance would he wear the green of Ireland?“The funny thing is up until I was about 12 I always supported France in everything,” says Hart, when the strictly neutral Rugby World posed the question. “Then as I got older I became more patriotic towards Ireland.“Obviously I don’t want to get ahead of myself, because I’m not even first-choice for Grenoble at the moment, but if in the future France approached me and Ireland have never given me a thought, I wouldn’t say no.”But there’s a long time to go before that might happen. Scrum-half is one position where the French have strength in depth, and Ireland aren’t exactly short in the department. For the time being Hart’s happy to try and fill his mantelpieces with more Oscars.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Hotshot: Leicester Tigers flanker Will Evans

first_imgDate of birth: 28 January 1997. Country: England. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Tiger tackled: Will Evans is caught during an Aviva Premiership match. (Photo: Getty Images) When did you first play rugby?When I was about five. My mum’s work colleague said I should go along to Wymondham RFC. I didn’t enjoy it too much to start with but I got into it. I stayed there until I went to Wymondham College when I was 14 and just did schools rugby after that.Have you played in different positions?I was fly-half until I was 14 or 15. My coach at Wymondham College, Roger Morgan, said I would be a lot more useful in the back row. Seven is now my fixed position.How did you get involved with Leicester Tigers?They spotted me in the Norfolk Player Development Programme. I joined their academy at 16 and went to Queen Elizabeth College in Leicester to do my A levels.And when did you first play representative rugby?For England U18 last year.Who’s had a big influence on you?Brett Deacon at Leicester has helped me with my turnovers and tackling.You didn’t play in the U20 Six Nations in 2016…I was disappointed not to make the squad, but I put a massive emphasis on improving my game and I played for Leicester around that time. TAGS: Leicester Tigers Was Premiership rugby a big step up?It was a massive shock. It is such a fast pace but it gave me the confidence that I could mix it with international players in there.You must be pleased with how the U20 World Championship went…It was a pleasure to be involved and I really enjoyed it. We played some outstanding rugby.What are your aims for 2016-17?To play more Premiership rugby, work harder, and get fitter and stronger. RW Verdict: This teenage openside stepped into the Leicester team in the spring of 2016 and thrived, then he was named in the U20 World Cup Dream Team having been a key player in England’s triumph. He has a big career ahead of him.First published in the August 2016 edition of Rugby World magazine.last_img read more

WATCH: Was This The Moment That Assured Wales’ Victory Over Wallabies?

first_img Michael Cheika: “I don’t know the rules anymore” 2019 Rugby World Cup: Australia 25-29 Wales WATCH: Was This The Moment That Assured Wales’ Victory Over Wallabies?In every single close contest at the Rugby World Cup, there are special moments that have a huge say on the outcome of the match. A knock-on here, a crucial turnover there and the result can switch like the flip of a coin.The Group D contest between Wales and Australia was just like that throughout, as each side looked to build on momentum and get the crucial four points. Wales got out of the starting blocks quickly as they surged into a 10-0 lead.Adam Ashley Cooper dotted down for the Wallabies before Gareth Davies intercepted to score and give the Welsh a 23-8 half-time lead.After the break the Australians came roaring back as Dane Haylett-Petty and Michael Hooper scored tries and a Matt Toomua penalty put the score at 26-25. Rhys Patchell pinned the Australians back with a penalty of his own but in the 76th minute the Australia earned a penalty in their own half. The Samu Kerevi-Rhys Patchell incident is the latest… Tomos Williams pulled off an incredible piece of skill which stopped Australian momentum. Collapse Incredible Skill: Tomos Williams keeps the ball in play to stop Australian momentum (Credit: ITV) Five of the Best Wales v Australia Matches Five of the Best Wales v Australia Matches With the clock dwindling, the Wallabies had all the momentum and Toomua looked to have performed a huge kick into Welsh territory. Tomos Williams had other ideas though as he acrobatically, and perhaps unbelievably, managed to keep the ball in play so the Welsh could clear their lines.It was a moment that arrested the Australians somewhat as they could not believe it and it arguably assured the Welsh victory in a match that cannot be understated in its importance. Wales went to top of the group as a result and their their character was severely tested.center_img Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Wales hold on for a narrow victory against… Michael Cheika: “I don’t know the rules anymore” Expand 2019 Rugby World Cup: Australia 25-29 Wales Expand Jacob Whitehead has looked through the history books… Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Rapidísimas

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET La noticia de que el papa Benedicto XVI había renunciado a su cargo el 28 de enero después de ocho años en el cargo, circuló rápidamente por el mundo como ninguna. La decisión fue un secreto bien guardado pues sólo se encontraron muy pocos indicios en sus recientes presentaciones públicas. El papa presentó su decisión a un grupo de cardenales reunidos en el Vaticano en una declaración formal en latín. En la declaración dijo que la razón de su renuncia era su “edad avanzada” (cumplirá 86 años el mes que viene) y la necesidad de la iglesia de tener un hombre más joven que pudiera hacerle frente a los múltiples deberes de su ministerio. En ese sentido dijo que le “falta vigor para continuar”.La renuncia fue recibida en todas partes con “sorpresa y respeto”. Observadores de la escena vaticana dijeron que la edad es un factor fundamental pero que además existen problemas internos difíciles de resolver. Añadieron que los casos de pedofilia pueden haber sido factores determinantes, además de las presiones de un clero que en su mayoría desea tener la opción de casarse y las mujeres que se sienten llamadas a la ordenación.La prensa romana destacó las palabras de Giorgio Napolitano, Jefe del Estado italiano, que elogió su “extraordinaria valentía” y “generosidad” al admitir que le faltaban fuerzas para continuar. El presidente francés, François Hollande, no quiso opinar pero dijo que la decisión es “respetable”. Angela Merkel, canciller alemana e hija de un pastor luterano dijo que la decisión “es difícil y que merece todo respeto”. Además, le deseó bendiciones de Dios en su nueva vida y añadió que su coterráneo es “uno de los más significativos pensadores religiosos de nuestra época”.No todos son elogios, el profesor presbiteriano mexicano Leopoldo Cervantes-Ortiz dice en un despacho de la agencia ALC que entre los factores de la dimisión del papa están la “casi inmanejable crisis” ocasionada por los casos de pederastia en diversos países y, particularmente, “la impunidad con que la iglesia” manejó el caso de abuso sexual del sacerdote mexicano Marcial Maciel, fundador de la orden de los Legionarios de Cristo. Añadieron también la alarmante disminución de fieles en México, América Latina y Europa. El jueves 14 de febrero por orden judicial la arquidiócesis de Los Ángeles entregó 24 nombres adicionales de sacerdotes acusados de “abuso infantil”.Justin Welby, nuevo arzobispo de Cantórbery dice “mientras me preparo para tomar posesión de mi cargo no hablo sólo por mí mismo, y mis predecesores como arzobispo, sino por los anglicanos de todo el mundo, para dar gracias a Dios por la vida sacerdotal totalmente dedicada, de palabra y de obra, en la oración y en el servicio costoso de seguir a Cristo. Benedicto XVI ha puesto ante nosotros algo del significado del ministerio petrino de edificar al pueblo de Dios a su plena madurez”.Después de 63 años el Consejo Nacional de Iglesias de Estados Unidos trasladará sus oficinas centrales de Nueva York a Washington por razones económicas. Ahorrándose así unos 500,000 dólares en los próximos años. La nueva sede estará localizada en el antiguo Edificio Metodista frente al Capitolio y la Corte Suprema. Por su arquitectura rectangular de 19 pisos, el edificio de Nueva York es conocido como “La Caja de Dios”.Siguen los informes contradictorios sobre la salud del presidente Hugo Chávez. Esta semana su vice Nicolás Maduro, dijo que está ahora bajo “tratamientos complejos y duros” en La Habana tras la operación de diciembre. Ya los días de su ausencia de Venezuela pasan de 60. Por otra parte, la reciente devaluación del bolívar en un 32 por ciento con respecto al dólar es como para no dormir. Esta es la quinta devaluación en 10 años. (A última hora aparecieron fotos de Chávez con dos de sus hijas)El senador de la Florida, Marco Rubio, tuvo el honor de responder al discurso del presidente Obama sobre el Estado de la Unión, un discurso anual en el que el presidente se dirige al congreso y al pueblo e informa sobre la marcha del país. Es costumbre que una persona de la oposición refute algunas afirmaciones. Rubio que la revista Time puso su foto en la portada y dijo que era la esperanza de los republicanos. Los medios criticaron que se agachó para alcanzar una botella de agua y se empinó de la misma. Dijeron que ese hecho es señal de mala educación. Sin embargo, de este limón, Rubio ha hecho una limonada. Al promocionar botellas de agua con su nombre por el precio de $25 a $250 dólares.VERDAD. ¿Qué le dice una piedra a otra piedra? ¡Qué vida tan dura! Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Por Onell A. SotoPosted Feb 18, 2013 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rapidísimas Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

La Convención General aprueba la igualdad matrimonial

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel La Convención General aprueba la igualdad matrimonial Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK General Convention 2015, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Human Sexuality, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Same-Sex Marriage Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] A raíz del dictamen del Tribunal Supremo de EE.UU. el 26 de junio, en el que se legalizaba el matrimonio entre personas del mismo sexo para todos los norteamericanos, la Convención General siguió el ejemplo el 1 de julio con cambios canónicos y litúrgicos a fin de ofrecerles igualdad matrimonial a todos los episcopales.La Cámara de Diputados convino con la aprobación de la Cámara de Obispos el día antes de un cambio canónico que eliminaba el lenguaje que definía el matrimonio como entre un hombre y una mujer (Resolución A036) y autorizaba dos nuevos ritos matrimoniales para ser usados igualmente con parejas del mismo sexo o de sexos opuestos (Resolución A054).Las resoluciones marcaron la culminación de un diálogo que empezara cuando la Convención General de 1976 dijera que “las personas homosexuales son hijos de Dios que tienen pleno e igual derecho, con todas las demás personas, al amor, la aceptación y el interés y cuidado pastoral de la Iglesia”, dijo el Muy Rdo. Brian Baker, vicepresidente del Comité Legislativo Especial sobre el Matrimonio. “Esa resolución comenzó un diálogo de 39 años acerca de qué aspecto tendría ese pleno e igual derecho. El diálogo ha sido difícil para muchos y doloroso para muchos”.Las resoluciones A054 y A036 representaron compromisos a los que se llegaron después de devota consideración y conversación dentro del comité legislativo, y luego la Cámara de Obispos le dio cabida a todo el mundo, dijo Baker. “Sé que la mayoría de ustedes encontrará algo en las resoluciones … que le disguste y con lo que discrepe”, señaló, pidiéndoles a los diputados “que miraran a través de las lentes de cómo este compromiso le dio cabida a otras personas”.Los diputados rechazaron un intento de enmendar cada una de las resoluciones. Luego de unos 20 minutos de debate por resolución, cada resolución fue aprobada en un voto por órdenes. La A054 fue aprobada 94 a 12 con dos diputaciones divididas en el orden clerical y 90-11-3 en el orden de los laicos. La A036 fue aprobada por 85-15-6 en el orden clerical y 88-12-6 en el orden de los laicos.Además de autorizar dos nueva liturgias matrimoniales, la A054 aprueba también el continuo uso de “El testimonio y la bendición de un pacto de por vida” que aparece en Recursos litúrgicos I, que la Convención General aprobó para uso provisional en 2012 “bajo la dirección y con la autorización del obispo que ejerza la autoridad eclesiástica”.A principios de la semana, los obispos dividieron, para fines del debate, la porción de la A054 que trata del rito existente de la que aborda las nuevas liturgias, votando finalmente la aprobación de ambas porciones. Aprobaron la A036 en una votación de viva voz, con 129 a favor, 26 en contra y cinco abstenciones.“En mi primera Convención General en 1991, no creo haber soñado jamás que habríamos de tener tal resolución ante nosotros”, dijo Bruce Garneer, diputado de Atlanta al tiempo de que se iniciara el debate sobre la A054. “Vine a Salt Lake City como un ciudadano de segunda clase en mi nación y en mi Iglesia y espero irme de aquí como un ciudadano de primera clase en ambas”.Entre las voces disidentes estuvo la de Holden Holsinger, de la Diócesis de Michigan Oriental y miembro de la Presencia Oficial de la Juventud, quien instó a rechazar la resolución “a fin de mantener la unidad de la Iglesia”.Las dos nuevas liturgias, “El testimonio y bendición de un matrimonio” y “La celebración y bendición de un matrimonio 2” de Recursos litúrgicos 1: te bendeciré y serás una bendición, [versión] revisada y ampliada 2015, de los materiales suplementarios de la Comisión Permanente sobre Liturgia y Música que aparecen en el Libro Azul, están autorizadas a usarse a partir de este Adviento. Esos ritos ofrecen la opción de usar “mujer” “marido”, “persona” y “cónyuge”, haciéndolas de este modo aplicables a todas las parejas. Las liturgias pueden encontrarse en las páginas -151 aquí, de los materiales proporcionados a la Convención por la comisión permanente, incluido uno de ellos rechazado por los obispos en sus deliberaciones.La A054 estipula: “Los obispos que ejerzan autoridad eclesiástica o, donde fuere apropiado, supervisión eclesiástica, facilitarán que todas las parejas que pidan casarse en esta Iglesia tengan acceso a estas liturgias. El uso experimental sólo estará disponible a discreción y con permiso del obispo diocesano”.La resolución dice también que “los obispos pueden continuar ofreciendo generosa respuesta pastoral a las necesidades de los miembros de esta Iglesia”. Durante la discusión en su cámara, los obispos dijeron que esta [cláusula] tenía la intención de responder a situaciones de obispos en jurisdicciones fuera de Estados Unidos, tales como Italia y países de la IX Provincia, donde los matrimonios entre personas del mismo sexo seguían siendo ilegales.Ambas resoluciones dicen que los clérigos conservan el derecho canónico de rehusar oficiar en cualquier boda.La Resolución A036 revisa el Canon I.18 titulado “De la solemnización del Santo Matrimonio” (página 58 de los Cánones de la Iglesia Episcopal aquí). Entre muchas correcciones, elimina las referencias al matrimonio como contraído entre un hombre y una mujer. La primera versión revisada del canon dice ahora que el clérigo “se avendrá a las leyes del Estado que rigen la creación del estado civil del matrimonio, y también a estos cánones en lo concerniente a la solemnización del matrimonio. Los miembros del clero pueden solemnizar un matrimonio usando cualquiera de las formas litúrgicas autorizadas por esta Iglesia”.En conformidad con el canon revisado, las parejas firmarían una declaración de intenciones, que el comité legislativo redactó para respetar las necesidades de parejas donde uno solo de sus miembros sea cristiano.El Rdo. Joseph Howard, de Tennessee, dijo que votaba a favor de la A054 “porque pensaba que era una declaración de honestidad respecto adonde está la Iglesia y porque regulariza lo que estamos haciendo”. Pero se opuso a la A036 “como un voto contra el buen orden porque creo que asume una creencia que aún no ha llegado a estar clara en nuestra Iglesia”.James Steadman, de Pensilvania Noroccidental, citó las palabras de la oración de postcomunión del Libro de Oración Común, y [luego] le dijo a los diputados: “Este es el momento. Usen el valor por el que han estado orando todos estos años y voten a favor de esta resolución”.En otra resolución relacionada con el matrimonio, la Cámara de Diputados aprobó a principios de la semana la Resolución A037, luego de rechazar varias enmiendas, conviniendo con los obispos en continuar la labor del Equipo de Trabajo sobre el Estudio del Matrimonio.La resolución pide a las congregaciones que estudien los materiales elaborados por el Equipo de Trabajo sobre el Matrimonio, los cuales están ahora a disposición de las congregaciones (a partir de la página 9 aquí), para que les ayuden a entender la teología del matrimonio y el largo historial del matrimonio, le dijo Baker a los diputados.Autoriza también la continua labor del equipo de trabajo “porque la tarea no ha concluido”, explicó Baker. [La resolución] invita a la exploración de la diversidad teológica y cultural para llevar adelante la conversación, dijo él, añadiendo que con frecuencia el estudio se ha concentrado en la perspectiva anglooccidental “cuando somos una Iglesia que tiene personas de diferentes naciones”.— Sharon Sheridan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Por Sharon Sheridan Posted Jul 2, 2015 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET General Convention, Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

Trinity Episcopal Church calls Julia Whitworth as new rector

first_img Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Judy Lawes says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted Apr 12, 2016 Press Release Service People Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN The Reverend Canon Julia Whitworth has accepted the call as the 12th rector of Trinity Episcopal Church, Indianapolis. She serves as Canon for Liturgy and the Arts at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine in New York City. Her anticipated first Sunday at Trinity isJuly 10, 2016“I am honored to be elected Trinity’s new Rector. I am inspired by Trinity’s historic commitment to a powerful combination of beautiful liturgy, deep spiritual inquiry, and vital mission outreach in the city of Indianapolis,” Canon Whitworth said. “I look forward to joining Trinity in its mission to reflect the love of God and Gospel of Jesus Christ in and on your community.”Canon Whitworth has a passion for liturgy and music, preaching, and prophetic witness to the Church’s call to be a significant voice for social justice. She is also deeply committed to the integration of children and families in all aspects of the Church, especially through education, liturgy, music and service, and joyful community-building.“We are so very blessed that Canon Whitworth has decided to accept Trinity’s call. Her liturgical excellence, scholarly preaching, strong interpersonal skills, and enthusiasm about serving a church in the heart of the city make her the perfect match for rector of our beloved church,” stated the search committee co-chairs.Whitworth was ordained an Episcopal priest after a previous career as a theatre director and college professor. She has directed new plays and classics in New York and regionally, and is cofounder of “Shakespeare in Stonington,” a summer program of Opera House Arts, on Deer Isle, Maine. She has taught theatre and performance studies, directing, and acting at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts and Mount Holyoke College.After divinity school at Union Theological Seminary, Canon Whitworth’s first call as a priest was to St. James’s Episcopal Church in West Hartford, Connecticut, where she oversaw adult education and youth ministries. At the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, she plans and implements a wide array of worship offerings, ranging from small daily Eucharists to large-scale services for over 3000 people. Additionally, she collaborates on the visual and performing arts programming at the Cathedral as part of its commitment to civic engagement through cultural offerings.Canon Whitworth and her husband, Ray Neufeld, have three young children. April 12, 2016 at 4:56 pm Congratulations, Julia , and best wishes from your friends at St. James’s. April 13, 2016 at 5:38 am Blessings on your new ministry, Julia! Your gifts will be well used.From St. John’s, West Hartford,Hope and Bill Eakins The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Trinity Episcopal Church calls Julia Whitworth as new rector Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments (2) Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Hope and Bill Eakins says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

Ecumenical greetings to ACC-16 from Roman Catholic Church

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican Consultative Council, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img Ecumenical & Interreligious Ecumenical greetings to ACC-16 from Roman Catholic Church Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Tags Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anglican Communion, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Posted Apr 12, 2016 Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cardinal Kurt Koch, President of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, sent greetings to members of ACC-16Photo: Wikimedia / Ch-info.ch[Anglican Communion News Service] Father Tony Currer, officer responsible for Anglican Relations at the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity (PCPCU), brought a message of greeting to all the participants of the 16th Anglican Consultative Council Meeting, in Lusaka (8 to 19 April) from His Eminence Cardinal Kurt Koch, President of the PCPCU.Grace and peace to you in Christ Jesus our Lord! On behalf of the Roman Catholic Church, and in particular of its Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, I send heartfelt greetings to all of you gathered for this 16th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council.This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the historic meeting between His Grace Archbishop Michael Ramsey and Blessed Pope Paul VI. A direct fruit of that meeting was the Joint Preparatory Commission which in turn led to the establishment of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC), now in its third phase. We give thanks for those ground-breaking steps taken fifty years ago, which have greatly improved our mutual understanding and the warm friendship that has grown between our two communions.Working in tandem with ARCIC and, indeed, building upon its achievements, we now have a second commission jointly sponsored by the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and the Anglican Communion Office. The International Anglican-Roman Catholic Commission for Unity and Mission (IARCCUM) works for the reception of ARCIC, that the agreements made between us will have a real transforming impact on our ecclesial life in dioceses across the world. The commission is made up of pairs of bishops, one Anglican and one Catholic, from each Anglican Province and corresponding Episcopal Conference where our two communities exist in significant numbers. The task of these bishops is to promote joint initiatives, particularly in mission and witness, and to be advocates of collaboration between our two communities.We will mark the fiftieth anniversary of Archbishop Ramsey’s meeting with Pope Paul with a meeting of these IARCCUM bishops. During this meeting the bishops will share their experiences and pastoral challenges, and strategize as to how our two communions can work together more closely in ecumenical witness to the world. This fiftieth anniversary celebration is one full of hope, therefore, and one that looks to the future. I ask for your prayers for this initiative, that it will bear much fruit and carry us towards the unity for which Christ prayed.Our theological dialogue has produced some very important agreements. A key theme recognised very early in its history, was the ecclesiology of communion. The co-chairmen noted the prominence of this theme in their preface to ARCIC I’s Final Report. ARCIC II devoted a whole document to it, and built upon the theme further in subsequent documents. God, through the missions of the Son and Spirit, has invited us into the communion of the most holy Trinity, and communion with God implies communion with one another. To respond with faith to God’s gracious invitation, always demands that we attend with care to the relationships between ourselves. Living in communion means that the wellbeing of each is the concern of all. And when we live this communion well we offer a vision to our world of the communion God wills for all of His creation.This meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council is an important moment in your living of communion, and therefore of the witness that you, as Anglicans, give to others. Across the world and between different continents and cultures, there are profound differences in our understanding of the human person and morals. Christian communities with a worldwide reach such as yours can provide an example of how to talk and, most especially, how to listen across these cultural and regional differences. I am reminded of the words Pope Francis addressed to the fathers of the extraordinary Synod of bishops in 2014. He invited them both to speak honestly and to “listen with humility and welcome, with an open heart”. As Archbishop Welby has said, we need to show the world how to “disagree well”, which is to say, to disagree while listening with respect and care to the other. To “disagree well” means that we start from the presumption of goodwill: that each member of the communion is, in his or her context, trying to respond to the gospel summons with honesty and generosity; that divergent positions are reached with integrity. Finally, to “disagree well” means that we never give up in our search for agreement, but that we strive for to find a better and a larger consensus. Our very disagreement shows us just how much we need one another. It shows that I cannot, in the specificity of my culture and context, discern God’s will and His truth alone. It is the whole of His people that God guides on its pilgrim way and leads into truth. In our search for God we rely upon one another.All our effort in seeking Christian unity is based upon this careful, generous listening, a necessary virtue for all God’s faithful people. Our ecumenical endeavour is one of attending to our communion relationships even when our communion is partial or damaged. This meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council, very much like our own recent synods of bishops, requires the virtue of careful and generous listening.My prayer for you as participants of this 16th Anglican Consultative Council is the same as my prayer for all your four of the instruments of communion: that through the exercise of each; that through faithful listening to the Lord in the scriptures; and by careful listening to each other, the bonds of the communion between the Provinces will be strengthened and deepened.Yours in Christ,Kurt Cardinal Koch Submit a Press Release ACC16, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more

Q&A: Samira Izadi Page, founder of Dallas’ Gateway of Grace

first_imgQ&A: Samira Izadi Page, founder of Dallas’ Gateway of Grace By Lynette Wilson Posted Jul 6, 2017 The Rev. Fred Fenton says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Refugees Migration & Resettlement Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments are closed. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Mary Kathryn Berry says: July 6, 2017 at 5:50 pm This is one of the most inspiring and challenging stories that has ever appeared in Episcopal News Service. In the face of cruel US government policies, delaying the acceptance of immigrants fleeing for their lives and tearing families apart by arresting and deporting our undocumented sisters and brothers, sincere followers of Jesus must act. Samira is an example to us all. Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Comments (4) Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Anne Garbarino says: Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY July 12, 2017 at 7:47 pm Incredible, inspiring story…how I wish all immigrants were of this calibre and willing to help us help them…it makes me want to join with the organization in supporting them all the way…her grace and courage under much pressure touches my soul and I pray for her success with the organization she is chairing…God’s blessings. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel [Episcopal News Service – Dallas, Texas] Episcopal News Service spoke with the Rev. Samira Izadi Page, founder and executive director of Gateway of Grace, about her life, fleeing Iran in 1989, her journey to the United States a year later, and her ministry during a recent interview at her office in Dallas.Gateway of Grace is a ministry that mobilizes Episcopal and other churches to bridge sociocultural gaps, and remove the fears, anxieties and spiritual apathy that stand in the way of Christians connecting with refugees. Gateway partners with more than 50 congregations to adopt refugee families upon arrival, and provides job readiness, language and other trainings.On Wednesday nights, Gateway of Grace hosts Grace Community, providing a space for fellowship, prayer, worship, a meal and Bible study for Christian refugees who fled persecution in their home countries, and Muslim refugees who are interested in learning about Christianity. The community includes refugees from 16 countries — including Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, Cameroon, Syria — and six religious backgrounds.In February, when the Trump administration first announced its executive order suspending the refugee resettlement program and restricting travel from seven majority-Muslim countries, Gateway of Grace initiated a 30 Days of Prayer for Refugees campaign. Many of the refugees served by Gateway of Grace have family members and friends whose lives are in limbo.You have an incredible story. Can you describe briefly your journey from Iran to the United States, what drove you to flee your country and seek political asylum?My ex-husband was a Sunni Muslim, I was a Shia and he was persecuted. It’s a very long story, but one morning I was working on my Ph.D. and there was a knock at the door and when I opened the door life as we knew it just ended. The intelligence service came in, they tore the house apart and they found a copy of Salman Rushdie’s “[The] Satanic Verses” and that was basically the end for us. My husband, lucky enough, wasn’t home, but they took everything that we had at the house and they shut down his business, they shut down our accounts, and we escaped Iran empty-handed, walking through four feet of snow over two nights with two kids. We nearly froze to death.The Rev. Samira Izadi PageAge: 44 (on June 12, 2017)Born: Shiraz, IranResidence: Dallas, TexasWho: An Episcopal priest in the Diocese of Dallas and founder and executive director of Gateway of Grace. Professional background: Bachelor’s and master’s degrees in philosophy earned in Iran. Attended seminary at Southern Methodist University: Master of Divinity and Doctorate in Ministry focused on missional church studies. Ordained a deacon in 2010; a priest in 2011.We went to Turkey. My husband’s brothers sent us money from Dubai, and we hired smugglers and they took us from Turkey to Mexico, and they left us in the middle of Mexico City with nothing; less than $500, no documentations, we had nothing. On the 10th day that we were there I saw a store that sold oriental rugs and I thought that may have something to do with Persian rugs so I went up to the store and I said, “Do you have any Persian rugs?” By my accent, he immediately knew I was Iranian. He started speaking back Farsi and I started crying. I said, “Stay right here, I’m going to get my husband,” and as soon as he came up he said, “Aren’t you the son of Mr. so-and-so?” That guy’s father had been my husband’s tenant back in our hometown. What are the odds of meeting someone from your own country of 60-some million, your hometown of a few million, whose father had been your tenant, in the largest city in the world on the 10th day? Every step that we took it was like that.We were there for a year, it’s a long, long story, but then we crossed the border at New Laredo and walked through the river and turned ourselves in at the immigration post and applied for asylum. They said, “Where do you want to go?” My husband said, “Dallas.” It was really random. I wanted to go to California because that’s where most Iranians are, but my husband said, “Let’s go to Dallas.” It was a God thing really. And we got to Dallas at 7 a.m. and I thought, OK, we are going to have a job and an apartment today. A cab driver took us to Motel 6 from the downtown bus station. I saw Yellow Pages, which I had never seen before. I started looking for apartment locators, started calling, found out we couldn’t rent an apartment because we didn’t have Social Security numbers or jobs. I saw Islamic center, so I called them up and they said that they couldn’t help, but they knew of a lady who worked with refugees. They gave me the number, I called the lady and she sent someone. By 9:30 this guy was at our door and he said I have an apartment, I’m not sure whether you are going to like it or not. He took us to a two-bedroom, fully furnished apartment. By 11:30 we were in our own apartment. We had done our grocery shopping. We had paid a month of rent in a city where we didn’t know a soul; without documentation.Now, these people, they were Christians, but they worked with Bosnian refugees who are Muslims. That’s how the mosque knew of them. They had prepared that apartment for a Bosnian family that was supposed to come a month before us. They never showed up, so it was just sitting. We walked right into it. When I told this man about my interest in Christianity he said, “Well why don’t you all come to church with us?” We went. It was a Baptist church, and I was baptized just six months later.You were eventually given refugee status. Would you say your journey was typical or atypical?It was atypical because refugees usually come in with full legal status. They come in with Social Security cards, they get work permits, but we had nothing. It was extremely difficult. That’s why I have so much compassion for refugees because I know where they’ve been.You were born into a Shiite Muslim family and you married a Sunni Muslim. How did your family react to your conversion to Christianity?My family was nominally Muslim, so there was never a conversation about religion at home. But my mom knew that I had a vision of the Virgin Mary when I was 6, so when I told her when I was about to be baptized, I called my mom and I said, “Mom, remember my vision?” and she immediately knew what I was talking about. I said, ‘Well, that’s happening,’ and she was happy. She is now a Christian; she was baptized about a year and a half ago, and now she’s being persecuted in Iran.How did you find yourself in the Episcopal Church?[By the] second year in seminary I knew that I couldn’t be a Baptist because of the sacraments and the understanding of ministry. My understanding was somewhat more ontological, who I was, rather than the function of, and the director of spiritual formation at Perkins was an Episcopal priest, Father Fred Schmidt. He is now at Garrett [Evangelical] Theological [Seminary]. I shared my testimony with him, and he said, “Well, have you considered joining the Catholic Church?” because of the vision of Virgin Mary. And I said, “Well I have a call to ministry,” and he said, “Well, why don’t you come to my church and visit.” I went that Sunday. And years and years ago, when I was 14 or 15, I had this dream and in that dream, I was thirsty looking for water. I was in a room that was in the shape of a hexagon and it was all marble and it was enclosed and I went round and round, and there in the middle of the room was a font. That stayed with me, and here I am many years later in the United States, becoming a Christian and I’m entering this church, Church of the Incarnation in Dallas. And I’m late and I have no idea what the Episcopal Church is and so I was kind of intimidated, and I enter through the back door, kind of the side door, and as I entered the first thing that hit me in the face almost was that font that I had seen in my dream. That’s how I knew I belonged there.Where did the idea of Gateway of Grace come from?When my curacy was coming to an end I started praying asking God what it was that he wanted me to do. And as I was praying through my life, it’s not like there was shortage of clergy here for God to bring an Iranian woman with an accent to serve at the parish, because as wonderful as that would be it would have nothing to do with my experience, what God had taught me through those experiences. So, I started to look at the refugee population, and at that time I had already worked with refugees for a couple of years. And I started looking at what was available to them, and Texas was the largest hub for refugees up until last year and now it is second to California. And I noticed there were churches that were doing holistic ministry, like the Baptist church that adopted me kind of intrinsically, and then there were churches or refugee organizations or ministries that were very secular: They would just give refugees stuff or help them, but they wouldn’t want to talk about the spiritual matters. Then there were, on the other side, people – “Are you saved, do you know Jesus yet?” And then there were a lot of programs but there wasn’t any systematic way of mobilizing churches to do a holistic type of ministry that would address not only the practical needs but also the emotional and spiritual needs of refugees. When we were praying about the name we thought, well, what is the one thing that distinguishes Christianity from all other religions, and that’s grace. And the instrument that God uses to communicate that grace into the world is the church, therefore, the church is the gateway of God’s grace, so Gateway of Grace.How did you end up focusing your doctoral thesis on decreasing anxiety and fear about refugees among Christians?When I got my doctorate, I wanted to do something that was relevant to the work I was doing and I wanted a very systematic, very Anglican kind of Episcopal way of removing fears and prejudices and spiritual apathy. Those are big issues, at least here in Dallas, just the unknowing. The idea was how do we use scripture, tradition, reason and social studies, all that we have in our church to address these issues specifically, and move them from the place of fear, anxiety, hatred, anger, unknowing to engagement in God’s mission through ministry to refugees?Why do you think Christians (Americans) harbor so much fear and anxiety?Well, part of it is the media. The media provides, whether it’s liberal or conservative, Republican or Democrat, or anything in between, they each provide a slice of reality. They don’t provide the entire pie of reality, and while those realities are factual, they are not the entire picture and thus they form an alternative reality that’s not accurate. But people who are not familiar personally with refugees, they buy that because that’s all they are introduced to, so media is a huge part of it; the way they present the issue.In your experience have you found that alleviating those fears comes through compassion and acceptance and is that possible only through personal relationships?So that’s what my thesis is about. It’s a whole workshop, it’s a whole process of how do we address those issues, so I use ancient prayer methods, social studies to kind of address the fears and the concerns and do a spiritual formation and move them from that place to refugee ministry.Unlike in Europe, where disaffected first-generation European Muslims have staged large-scale terrorist attacks, the United States hasn’t seen the same kind of violence. Yet, Americans live in fear of such attacks. How do you address or alleviate the fear that many white Christian Americans express? Not just in terms of fear of the other, but living in fear of a terrorist attack? Because they come with real fear, they see this stuff on television.I think the key is to acknowledge the fear because those fears are real. We had a shooting in Garland, Texas, that was done by a Muslim extremist, shooting [up] a library. So those are not things that are impossible to happen in the U.S., therefore the fears are real, right? But how probable are they? That’s a different question. So far refugee resettlement has been a very successful program and we haven’t had any issues with our refugees. I’m a Muslim background believer and I have a holistic ministry. Part of it is evangelistic ministry to refugees, many of whom are Muslims, many of whom are very conservative, so I understand the fear. So, for them to be able to connect to someone who would just acknowledge their fear and have sympathy for their fear and not just dismiss it, then that’s really the first big step. The other parts of it are, as I do in my workshop, how do we move forward, and that’s through this whole process that we do with our volunteers and it takes time and patience. But I’ve seen people who did not like refugees, did not like Muslims, who are now huge advocates for refugees.The U.S. Refugee Resettlement Program is a public-private partnership and six of the nine resettlement partners are faith based. The affiliate network and the nonprofits working locally also tend to be faith based. Not to compare or say the U.S. system is necessarily better than the European system, which varies by country, but do faith-based partners lead to better rates of integration?Absolutely.How so?Resettlement agencies such as Catholic Charities and International Rescue Committee or other organizations, they have limited financial resources and limited manpower, but in the church, we have all these resources. We have the manpower and the financial resources that we need to minister to refugees, but more importantly refugee resettlement agencies or secular organizations, they provide services, and those are for a limited number of months or until [refugees] get on their feet. But what churches do, they not only add to the services and fill in the gap where services are lacking, but they add Christian care. Services and care are two different things. I think that’s really important for the healing process, for the integration process. And, then on top of that, where these agencies leave off, the relationships that churches have formed, and by churches, I mean individual Christians, they continue to grow, and I think that’s a gift to the refugees that they are able to connect with Americans. Most refugees never come to experience real friendship with Americans, with Anglos, particularly.Gov. Greg Abbot pulled Texas out of the federal Refugee Resettlement Program, which indicates to me that statewide there’s some resistance to refugees. Still, resettlement continues with the federal funds channeled through nonprofit organizations, and Texas is second only to California in the number of refugees admitted. Can you share some insight into the dissonance?Political issues and people issues are two different things. I think the people of Texas are extremely generous, extremely loving, Dallas particularly. Or Texas is a Christian state, and while they might be politically conservative, they have the Holy Spirit in them, and the Holy Spirit moves them to reach refugees and to love them and to serve them whether they politically may agree with refugee resettlement or their political party is supportive of that.Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings, on the other hand, takes a position opposite the governor. He applauds the resettlement program. I read that one in four Dallas residents is foreign born. What makes Dallas, particularly, welcoming toward immigrants and refugees? How have they helped shape the city?What has helped them to be welcoming, it’s just the heart of the people. It’s not political, they are just good people, many of them just good Christians. It’s a very religious city, so that might have to do with it.I’m sure you’ve read stories about how refugees are revitalizing communities in the Rust Belt, in the Hudson Valley, where there are tons of Salvadorans and others from Central America who have really revitalized some of these smaller towns. Obviously, diversity makes cities stronger, communities stronger. Have you seen that here in DallasYes. There is a neighborhood in Dallas that used to be very violent. Refugees have been resettled there and the violence has been reduced, but I don’t think and those may be impactful in the ways that political decisions are made, like at the mayor’s level, but I don’t think that individual Dallasites think in those terms. I don’t think they think, what are we gaining from this? I think they just have a good and generous and compassionate heart.The U.S. Supreme Court recently temporarily upheld parts of President Donald Trump’s travel ban, refusing entry to people from six Muslim countries, unless they have a family connection or a university appointment. What has been the impact of the court’s decision on the community you serve?Our refugees are in Turkey. They are mostly persecuted Christians. They are really struggling with that decision because their situation now is unknown and they despair. Many of them are wondering whether they should go back to Iran, and that would be extremely dangerous because these are heavily persecuted Christians. And so it has been a very difficult six months or so for our refugees, anyways, but this recent decision has added definitely for that.So, you have a direct connection to refugees who are awaiting third-country resettlement?Iranians, they are particularly there in Turkey, and my sister and her husband, they are refugees in Turkey right now among others. So, yeah, we have a network of refugees that we connect to.–Lynette Wilson is managing editor of Episcopal News Service.  July 14, 2017 at 8:32 am I was very impressed by the writer’s story. I lived in Dallas for 24 years and taught many children that were in a sense refugees—Mexican American kiddos. One should not call these people refugees since Texas was once a part of Mexico. The folks add so much to the cultural life of a city, let alone the economy. In those years I belonged to a church in Oak Cliff (south sections of Dallas) that provided sanctuary to an extended family from El Salvador. We learned a lot from this family. Thanks for the article. Keep up the good work. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Martha Richards says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 6, 2017 at 4:55 pm Your story is amazing. Keep up the good work. I’m sure our Lord Jesus has given you the strength eo endure and will continue to bless your ministry. Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more