Boss Coleman insists Sunderland can stay up

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesSunderland boss Chris Coleman insisted they can still avoid relegation following their 1-0 defeat against QPR.Black Cats goalkeeper Jason Steele was sent off five minutes into the second half at Loftus Road, where teenage forward Ebere Eze scored the winner just after the hour mark.It left Coleman’s side rooted to the bottom of the Championship, four points from safety.But Coleman said: “We’ve got to keep going. The teams around us keep dangling carrots in front of us and as long as they’re not pulling away then we have to keep going.“If we can just get that win we can close the gap to a point. The players have got to show heart.”Embed from Getty ImagesSteele was red-carded after he dashed outside of his penalty area to meet Darnell Furlong’s punt forward, misjudged the bounce of the ball and then used his hand to direct it away from QPR forward Paul Smyth.Coleman said: “To have the keeper sent off five minutes into the second half, you can easily think: ‘Here we go again. It’s never going to change’.“We get a man sent off and then concede. But the boys didn’t buckle today in terms of their grit. We kept going until the end. It was always going to be hard for us after the sending-off.“We lost, but we showed a bit of personality. We didn’t whimper out of this one. We were in the game all through the game.“We are lacking confidence, but in terms of the performance and the mentality there was nothing wrong with that.” Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebookby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksRecommended for youAspireAbove.comRemember Pauley Perrette? Try Not To Smile When You See Her NowAspireAbove.comUndoLifestly.com25 Celebs You Didn’t Realize Are Gay – No. 8 Will Surprise WomenLifestly.comUndoUsed Cars | Search AdsUsed Cars in Tuen Mun Might Be Cheaper Than You ThinkUsed Cars | Search AdsUndoTopCars15 Ugliest Cars Ever MadeTopCarsUndoezzin.com20 Breathtaking Places to See Before You Dieezzin.comUndoFood World Magazine15 Fruits that Burn Fat Like CrazyFood World MagazineUndoDrhealth35 Foods That Should Never Be Placed in the RefrigeratorDrhealthUndoHappyTricks.comHer House Always Smells Amazing – Try her Unique Trick!HappyTricks.comUndolast_img read more

Getty Fire forces LeBron James to evacuate his Brentwood mansion

first_imgThe Getty Fire is threatening thousands of homes in Brentwood including that of Los Angeles Lakers superstar LeBron James.In the pre-dawn hours Monday the brush fire raged in the hillside communities on the west side of Los Angeles forcing mandatory evacuations. At 3:53 AM PT James tweeted that he was driving around looking for a place to stay with no luck. Man these LA 🔥 aren’t no joke. Had to emergency evacuate my house and I’ve been driving around with my family trying to get rooms. No …last_img read more

Web 3.0, The Cloud, and Vendor Lock-In

first_imgSo, while the Net itself has an end-to-end design, in which all the ends are essentially peers, the Web (technically an application on the Net) has a submisive-dominant design in which clients submit to servers. It’s a calf-cow model. As calves, we request pages and other files from servers, usually getting cookie ingredients mixed in, so the cow can remember where we were the last time we suckled, and also give us better services. Especially advertising.We have no choice but to agree with this system, if we want to be part of it. And, since the cows provide all the context for everything we do with them, we have onerous “agreements” in name only, such as what you see on your iPhone every time Apple makes a change to their store.Searls also rails against sort of agreements businesses impose on customers:Here’s the thing: client-server’s calf-cow model requires this kind of thing, because the system is designed so the server-cows are in complete control. You are not free. You are captive, and dependent.This system has substantiated a business belief that has been around ever since Industry won the industrial revolution: that a captive customer is more valuable than a free one.Searls’ contribution to an alternative to all of this, is what he calls Vendor Relationship Management, an inversion of Customer Relationship Management in which customers control their data and contact information. Searls writes:We won’t get rid of calf-cow systems, nor should we. They work, but they have their limits, and those become more apparent with every new calf-cow service we join. But we can work around these things, and supplement them with other systems that give us equal power on equal footings, including the ability to proffer our own terms, express our own preferences and policies, and make independent choices. […]The message I’m bringing is not about how these companies can improve the cow systems everybody has done so much to build and improve already. It’s about how buyers and sellers are no longer just cattle, and how we now need to prove something we’ve known all along: that free customers are more valuable than captive ones.The VRM Project, headed by Searls, defines VRM as “tools by which individuals can take control of their relationships with organizations — especially in commercial marketplaces.” We’ve covered it before and it’s been “the next big thing” for years. Maybe social business and social CRM are the movements that will make VRM a reality, but let’s face it: this may never happen.We might not ever see a real VRM movement, but we might be seeing the decline of the captive customer and vendor lock-in sooner than later.Vendor Lock-in and the CloudOracle’s continued success would seem to demonstrate that captive customers really are more valuable. But the question is whether customers will choose to be locked in if they have a choice. Companies like EnterpriseDB are staking their businesses on the idea that customers, given a choice, will prefer not to be captive. And there is real momentum behind open cloud standards (as long as we can avoid open washing), open source databases and, of course, Linux. Apache Hadoop is particularly disruptive because there is no viable proprietary alternative. SaaS makes it easier than ever to run pilot programs, and as long as customers can easily grab their data through an API, it’s all reasonably portable. For once, it seems like enterprises will have more customer freedom than consumers. Will that trickle down?Keeping customers captive requires that all vendors play-along. Moving from one walled garden to another isn’t necessarily appealing, but what happens when you give customers the freedom to easily jump from vendor to vendor?Lead photo by Steve Gibson Related Posts Tags:#Analysis#enterprise klint finley IT + Project Management: A Love Affair 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Ever since the term “Web 2.0” started to catch-on, people have been speculating as to what “Web 3.0” will be. Briefly stated, Web 1.0 was the Static Web and Web 2.0 is the Social Web (for more a more nuanced view of this history, see here). One popular theory is that the Semantic Web comes next. Others have also called for Web 3.0 to involve user-centric identity and data portability – technologies that would depend on many of the same open standards that would enable the Semantic Web. Others suggested personalization would be king.We’ve covered all these subjects over the years, and it seems that the Personal Web is what’s taking hold. Look at Netflix recommendations, Gmail Priority Inbox, Facebook’s prioritized activity stream and, a little less mainstream, services like GetGlue, Hunch and My6Sense. I would also include the “Quantified Self” movement, which includes applications like Mint.com, Run Keeper and Rescue Time.But we haven’t really seen the sort of openness many of us wanted from the Personal Web. The Attention Trust came and went. Facebook and Twitter are beating OpenID in the identity wars, and data portability on the consumer Web is still something of a pipedream. Lock-in is still king. But for how long?The Doctor’s DiagnosisIn a recent rant on his blog, Doc Searls comments on the entrenched client-server model of the Web. For those that have been following Searls for a while the message will be familiar. He uses this image to make his point:last_img read more

How to Build a Great Salesperson From Scratch

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now A sales organization can have no competitive advantage greater than an exceptional sales force, and an exceptional sales force is made up of great salespeople.How do you build the great salespeople that make up your exceptional sales force?Like this.Hire AttributesNothing after this line matters if you don’t hire people with the right attributes.You can’t build a great salesperson out of someone that lacks the character, the beliefs, the attitudes, and the attributes required to succeed in sales. Once you have a person that’s made up of the right stuff, only then you can build a great salesperson.You hire for attributes, train for skills.Combine Training and ExperienceYou build salespeople by giving them the training and development they need to succeed, and then you couple that training with experience. You train the fundamentals of selling and product knowledge in the classroom. You start to build a foundational understanding of the great game of sales inside your four walls.But learning to sell isn’t an academic exercise; you don’t learn to sell in a classroom. You build the salesperson by getting them in the field to use what they learned as quickly as possible. This is where your salesperson obtains the real learning outcomes; it’s where the academic discussion comes to life.But this training and gaining some foundational experience is only the beginning.Start CoachingIf you want to build a great salesperson, you have to help them make sense of what goes on in front of their dream clients. They learned some things in training, they attempt to use them in the field, some things go well, and some things go not quite so well.Training tends to come undone at first contact with a real prospective client.Coaching builds your salesperson by helping them make sense of their experience. It puts the training in context. It helps identify principles and their application. Was what went right on that sales call something the salesperson did well? Can you give them the positive feedback and reinforcement that makes that action their regular practice? Was went wrong caused by a mistake they made? Can you clear up their understanding of the principle they violated that resulted in that challenge? Can you give help them seeing the frame in which they are operating?Give More Training and Greater ChallengesBuilding great salespeople requires ongoing training. In fact, I’ve come to believe the second round of training is more valuable in producing better salespeople than the first round. But we too often quit after the first training, or at least let up.The experience between round one and round two totally changes what the salesperson gains from the training. In the second round of training, they’re looking for answers. They’re looking for help. And it’s no longer academic. Now that they’ve felt it, they have the kind of understanding that let’s you notch up their learning.Building great salespeople requires ongoing training and development, as well as providing them with greater challenges. Salespeople develop by tackling greater and greater challenges. Building them means making sure you help them find and tackle those greater challenges.Give Even More Sales CoachingThe top 20% of salespeople are coachable. They are always looking for an advantage, an edge. They are consistently trying to take on new ideas, anything that will allow them to succeed at an incrementally greater level.Ongoing coaching is the key to building great salespeople.Training and coaching isn’t something you can do once—or for a short time—and produce results. Growth and learning isn’t something that is accomplished in a single event. Building great salespeople requires a long-term commitment.QuestionsHow do you build an exceptional sales force?Can you build an exceptional sales force if you don’t hire well?What obligation do you owe your salespeople if you want to build champion?How important is coaching to growth and performance improvement?last_img read more

If You Are Not Asking, You Are Not Selling

first_imgIf you are not “asking,” you are not selling.It sounds nice to say things like, “I am facilitating a buying decision, and I will wait until my prospect tells me that they are ready to take the next step.” It sounds nice, but it isn’t. It’s abdicating your responsibility.Not asking doesn’t make you consultative. First let’s dispatch with the idea that not asking for commitments makes you consultative. It doesn’t. Consultants make recommendations on next steps as a matter of course. Consultants also help organizations change. The very nature of helping a company change not only requires asking for commitments, but it also requires asking for massive commitments of time, energy, money, and political capital.By not asking, you do not establish yourself as a peer. If you want to serve your dream client as a trusted advisor and a peer, you ask for the things that you know you need to make a difference. If you need access to and other stakeholders, you ask for that access. If you need information, you ask for the information. If you need your dream client to take a run through your proposal and presentation before you present, you book time on their calendar. A subservient, non-value creating salesperson who fears damaging relationships by asking for what they need will never be considered a peer.Not asking cedes the process to your prospective client, and it presupposes that you are not necessary beyond whatever point it is where you stop asking for commitments. Let’s say you make a discovery call and your dream client tells you that they will get back to you in the next few weeks. By not asking for a future commitment, you have agreed that you are irrelevant in the process of decision-making that they will engage in during those few weeks. If you make a proposal without asking for the business, you leave open the idea that your prospective client should consider this on their own, potentially looking at other partners. You need to ask for agreement on the process.By not asking, you don’t demonstrate your serious interest in helping your dream client make changes. Asking your dream client for their business shows your serious interest in working with them. Not asking demonstrates your apathy. There is nothing attractive or sexy about someone who is dispassionate about what they sell. People want to work with people who are all in on helping them get the results they need. You cannot be ambivalent. Therefore, you have to ask.Just ask.last_img read more