West Indies humiliated again

first_imgHOBART, Australia (AP): The warning signs were evident when a mostly full-strength West Indies lost a tour match by 10 wickets to a Cricket Australia selection with six players making their first-class debuts. Against Australia’s Test team, ranked No. 3 in the world, the mostly young and inexperienced players from the Caribbean never stood a chance, losing by an innings and 212 runs yesterday inside three days at Bellerive Oval. Fast bowler James Pattinson took five wickets in the second innings to complement fellow paceman Josh Hazlewood’s four-wicket haul in the first. Off-spin bowler Nathan Lyon, playing in his 50th Test, took three vital first-innings wickets that placed the West Indies in early trouble. And then there was the Australian batting. AUSTRALIA SATISFIED Australia declared their first innings on 583-4 led by Man of the Match Adam Voges’ unbeaten 269 and record 449-run fourth-wicket partnership with Shaun Marsh. The West Indies were forced to follow-on earlier yesterday when they scored just 223-9 in their first innings injured paceman Shannon Gabriel (left ankle) could not bat in either innings. The match ended before tea yesterday when the West Indies led by Darren Bravo’s 108 in the first innings, and Kraigg Brathwaite’s 94 in the second were bowled out for 148. The West Indies lost 14 wickets in a session and a half. The team announced yesterday that Gabriel would return home due to the injury and a tour replacement would be named in the coming days. Pattinson (5-27) took up where Hazlewood left off in a West Indies first innings dominated by Bravo’s seventh Test century. Pattinson’s haul included the second-innings wicket of Bravo for four, ensuring the West Indies batsman was dismissed twice in 37 minutes. The West Indies resumed on 207-6 yesterday morning in their first innings before Hazlewood (4-45) cleaned up the tail. Resuming on 94, Bravo hit two boundaries off Peter Siddle in the first over to reach the century mark. Brathwaite tried vainly to notch a late century in the second innings, hitting four boundaries in a row, before being bowled by Hazlewood to end the match. “To win in three days was very satisfying,” Australia captain Steve Smith said. West Indies captain Jason Holder said the big loss wasn’t unfamiliar to him or a team hit by player strikes, pay disputes, coach suspensions and a decision by many of the top players to choose lucrative international Twenty20 league contracts over Test duty. “It’s a situation we’ve been in for the past few months, the past few years, really,” Holder said. “We need to be more disciplined… to spend more time in the middle. Hopefully, we can come back strong in the second Test.” SCOREBOARD RECORDPARTNERSHIP AUSTRALIA 1st Innings 583-4 decl. WEST INDIES 1st Innings (overnight 207 for six) D.M. Bravo c Lyon b Siddle 108 K. Roach c wk Nevill b Hazlewood 31 J. Taylor b Hazlewood 0 J. Warrican not out 2 S Gabriel absent hurt Extras (b7, lb10, w1, nb5) 23 TOTAL (all out, 70 overs) 223 Fall of wickets: 1-17 (Brathwaite), 2-58 (Chandrika), 3-78 (Samuels), 4-78 (Blackwood), 5-89 (Ramdin), 6-116 (Holder), 7-215 (Roach), 8-215 (Taylor), 9-223 (Bravo) Bowling: Hazlewood 18-5-45-4, Pattinson 15-0-68-0 (w1, nb5), Siddle 15-5-36-2, Lyon 19-6-43-3, Marsh 3-1-14-0. WEST INDIES 2nd innings (following on) K. Brathwaite b Hazlewood 94 R. Chandrika c Smith b Pattinson 0 D.M. Bravo b Pattinson 4 M. Samuels c Warner b Pattinson 0 +D. Ramdin c Warner b MR Marsh 4 *J. Holder c wk Nevill b Pattinson 17 K. Roach c wkp Nevill b Hazlewood 3 J. Taylor c Pattinson b Hazlewood 12 J. Warrican not out 6 S. Gabriel absent hurt Extras (lb1, w1, nb3) 5 TOTAL (all out; 36.3 overs) 148 Fall of wickets: 1-2 (Chandrika), 2-20 (Bravo), 3-24 (Samuels), 4-24 (Blackwood), 5-30 (Ramdin), 6-60 (Holder), 7-91 (Roach), 8-117 (Taylor), 9-148 (Brathwaite). Bowling: Hazlewood 10.3-3-33-3, Pattinson 8-2-27-5 (w1, nb2), Siddle 7.-1-34-0, Marsh 7-0-36-1 (nb1), Lyon 4-0-17-0. Result: Australia won by an innings and 212 runs. Man-of-the-Match: Adam Voges. Toss: Australia. Umpires: M. Erasmus, I. Gould; TV – C Gaffaney.last_img read more

CARICOM Stages 13th Annual Road Race on July 7

first_img The race, which will have a 5km and 10km component, will see runners heading west towards downtown Montego Bay, making the first left turn at Ironshore and returning to the Convention Centre. Members of the public are invited to participate in the Caribbean Community’s (CARICOM) 13th annual Road Race scheduled to take place on Saturday (July 7) beginning at 6:00 a.m. at the Montego Bay Convention Centre in St. James.The event is being held in conjunction with the 39th CARICOM Heads of Government Conference from July 4 to 6 at the Convention Centre.The race, which will have a 5km and 10km component, will see runners heading west towards downtown Montego Bay, making the first left turn at Ironshore and returning to the Convention Centre.Participants in the 5km option of the race will take the same route, turning at the 2.5km mark and returning to the start.Alfred “Frano” Francis of Running Events Jamaica, who is the Race Director, told JIS News that about 200 persons are expected to participate, including athletes from some CARICOM countries.He said persons are required to register, so that they can have a bib with a number and a chip to record their time.The bibs will be distributed to registered persons at the Convention Centre on Friday, July 6 between 2:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m.“We are trying to have the highest standard where technology is concerned in road running here at the CARICOM Conference,” Mr. Francis noted.He said that members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) and the Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) will be on hand to direct motorists, as sections along the route will be closed to vehicular traffic between 5:30 a.m. and 8:30 a.m.“We are going to turn the western lane into the running course and the east-bound lane into a dual carriageway, so cars will be allowed to move up and down on the east bound lane,” he explained.“We are looking forward to having a well-executed event and an event that our Jamaicans will be proud of,” he added.Interested persons are required to register online at www.runningeventja.com or call Ricky Wisdom at (876) 967-4903 to request an entry form. There is no cost to participate.The annual Road Race was initiated by the CARICOM Secretariat in 2005, in keeping with the designation of the United Nations International Year of Sports and Physical Education that year.The event brings together professional and amateur athletes in the region in one single space to give voice to the positive influence of sports and physical education on the quality of life and in the promotion of peace and cooperation. Its overall intention is to promote a culture of healthy lifestyle. Members of the public are invited to participate in the Caribbean Community’s (CARICOM) 13th annual Road Race scheduled to take place on Saturday (July 7) beginning at 6:00 a.m. at the Montego Bay Convention Centre in St. James. Story Highlights The event is being held in conjunction with the 39th CARICOM Heads of Government Conference from July 4 to 6 at the Convention Centre.last_img read more

Rising Seas Will Overtake Land at Coastal Installations Study Concludes

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Military installations on the East and Gulf coasts are extremely vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, with rising sea levels expected to threaten increasing amounts of coastal land over the coming decades, according to an analysis by the Union of Concerned Scientists released Wednesday.Coastal installations will experience more extensive tidal flooding and when hurricanes strike, deeper and more extensive storm surge flooding, the study concluded.“We’re now at the front end of the changes that will occur, with some installations already dealing with flooding during extreme high tides,” said Erika Spanger-Siegfried, lead author of the report. “Depending on how fast sea level rises in the second half of this century, tidal flooding will become a daily occurrence in some areas; that is, those places become part of the tidal zone as opposed to useable land.”Sea level increases — already up 8 inches globally since 1880 — are the product of rising temperatures and ice melt primarily caused by global warming. The East and Gulf coasts experience some of the fastest rates of sea level rise, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.By 2050, half of the 18 installations the study evaluated would experience 270 or more flood events per year — up from just 10 events per year today — under an intermediate sea level-rise scenario. Under the highest scenario, those installations likely would experience daily floods.Four sites — Naval Air Station Key West, Fla.; Naval Station Mayport, Fla.; Fort Eustis at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va.; and Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. — stand to lose one-fifth or more of their land by 2050 due to daily high-tide flooding under the highest sea level-rise scenario.“In 2070, all but a few [of 18 installations studied] are projected to see flooding once or twice every day. Shockingly, these aren’t even the worst-case scenarios,” said co-author and lead analyst Kristy Dahl.DOD has been addressing the problem in recent years. At Langley AFB, Va., for example, the Air Force has constructed a shoreline seawall and door dams to protect some of its buildings, and it has installed a pump system to remove flood waters.“But there’s a big gap between what’s being done and what’s needed,” said Spanger-Siegfried.Installations should plan collaboratively with surrounding communities to counter the impact of rising seas on housing, transportation systems and critical infrastructure on and off installations, the report recommended.Individual installations also will need more detailed analyses of how rising seas will affect their infrastructure, as well as additional resources to adapt to the changing conditions, according to the study.last_img read more

Research shows crows comparable to humans when it comes to waiting

first_imgCorvus brachyrhynchos or Corvus caurinus. Image: Wikipedia. Citation: Research shows crows comparable to humans when it comes to waiting (2011, September 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-09-crows-humans.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Crows demonstrate their cleverness with tools (w/ Video) Explore further The researchers, led by Dr. Valerie Dufour from the Universite de Strasbourg, began their study by training 12 birds to exchange tokens for food. They gave each bird a piece of food. Keeping their giving hand closed, they showed the birds the reward in their other hand. After a waiting period, the researchers opened their giving hand again. The birds then received the reward if they gave back the initial piece of food.The maximum waiting period the researchers used was five minutes and the quality of the reward varied in each exchange. What the birds did during the waiting period varied with some birds leaving the food on the ground or hiding it and checking on it during the time period.This study shows that the crows are able to wait before making a decision and that this behavior is not limited to only humans and apes. While the researchers believed that the birds would be able to wait a few seconds, they were surprised that the birds were able to wait as long as they did.The destructive behavior, such as hiding the food and checking on it, enabled the crows to wait a longer period of time. Those birds with the longest waiting times all displayed this particular destructive behavior. © 2011 PhysOrg.com More information: Corvids can decide if a future exchange is worth waiting for, Biol. Lett. Published online before print September 14, 2011, doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2011.0726AbstractEvidence for time-dependent calculations about future rewards is scarce in non-human animals. In non-human primates, only great apes are comparable with humans. Still, some species wait for several minutes to obtain a better reward in delayed exchange tasks. Corvids have been shown to match with non-human primates in some time-related tasks. Here, we investigate a delay of gratification in two corvid species, the carrion crow (Corvus corone) and the common raven (Corvus corax), in an exchange task. Results show that corvids success decreases quickly as delay increases, with a maximal delay of up to 320 s (more than 5 min). The decision to wait rests both on the quality of the prospective reward and the time required to obtain it. Corvids also apply tactics (placing the reward on the ground or caching it) that probably alleviate costs of waiting and distract their attention during waiting. These findings contrast previous results on delayed gratification in birds and indicate that some species may perform comparably to primates.via ABC (PhysOrg.com) — In a new study published in Royal Society’s Biology Letters, researchers have discovered that crows and raven birds show the same ability to complete delayed exchange tasks as monkeys and humans do.last_img read more