No online awards for non-profits

No online awards for non-profits AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 5 February 1999 | News UK Fundraising has deplored the lack of online awards available to non-profits for several years. Any for-profit company could win an award for best Web site, best online marketing programme or best online advertising campaign. UK Fundraising has deplored the lack of online awards available to non-profits for several years. Any for-profit company could win an award for best Web site, best online marketing programme or best online advertising campaign. Fortunately the Yell awards in the UK have recognised the significance of the non-profit sector’s activity online and have introduced a category for best non-profit site for the past two years. (Amnesty International’s refugee campaign and RSPCA have been the winners). But still the message hasn’t sunk in. Michael Gilbert commented on the same issue in December. “The Webby Awards for Best Sites of the Year will be announced on January 6th, 1999. Looking at their categories, I wonder: Where do thousands of excellent nonprofit sites fit in? I’ve written them to ask.” Good for you, Michael. Awards aren’t everything of course, but they are as useful a publicity tool and acknowledgement of skill and expertise in the voluntary sector as they are in the for-profit sector. Advertisement read more

The 6 biggest mistakes people make when saving for retirement

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Katey TroutmanRetirement is one of those important milestones that proves perennially challenging for generation after generation of Americans, and, unfortunately it doesn’t seem to be getting any easier. According to the 2014 Retirement Confidence Survey, conducted by the Employee Benefits Institute, more than half of American workers have not calculated how much money they will need in retirement, meaning that millions may never achieve their retirement goals.Indeed, studies have shown that retirement in America is becoming something of a luxury. More and more Americans report that they expect to work during their retirement, for instance, and the “majority of workers (55%) expect to retire after age 65, or do not plan to retire at all,” according to a Gallup poll released last April. Further, the same study found that the average retirement age in the U.S. has risen to 62, the highest average Gallup has ever found since it first started collecting data on the retirement age in 1991.The Gallup study also found that “the average working household has virtually no retirement savings,” and cites stagnating wages as a key culprit. “The hope of retirement security is out of reach for many Americans in the face of crumbling retirement infrastructure,” the study notes, adding that the average American family has a median retirement balance of $3,000.The Gallup poll found that retirement savings are closely linked to income and wealth. Unsurprisingly, wealthier Americans are much more likely to own a retirement account, while lower-income families are much more likely to have little or no savings. According to the study, more than 38 million working-age households (45%) do not own any retirement account assets. continue reading »last_img read more

A small lesson from a large project

first_img 52SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr A trait of my elementary school teaching years, I often find that children’s literature captures lessons still applicable in adulthood. It’s strange, as adults, we spend hours digesting complex situations, analyzing and cross-referencing data, studying focus groups, research and the like; and still often times the solutions can be a simple as the lessons inspired by grade-school stories and nursery rhymes.Within our organization, I spent months purposing, convincing, and training our teams to care about member experience.  Creating compelling cases to better understand member’s needs – not just on a transactional level – but to truly understand how it feels to be a member. Within this I had my own visions – creating process efficiencies, enhancing workflows, telling stories to our leaders with data.  What I did not anticipate was that when I asked our teams to capture the feelings of our members—they would do just that.As our team members were empowered to engage with our members differently, the member’s stories were given a voice, and our CRM became the vehicle calling these stories to life. Transforming beyond just a call center or branch, our front lines felt empowered to use our CRM not just as a means for problem resolution, but as an engine to create impact. continue reading »last_img read more