Prior censorship and expulsion of foreign journalists deal “mortal blow” to press freedom

first_imgThe staff of the national television station also protested about the censorship on 12 April, whenFijians saw the following message on an otherwise black screen: “Viewers please be advised that there will be no 6 p.m. news tonight.” to go further Asia – Pacific Organisation News Help by sharing this information June 2, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Follow the news on Asia – Pacific According to the Public Emergency Regulations introduced under a 30-day state of emergency on 10 April, the permanent secretary for information now has complete control over what the news media report in Fiji, and officials have urged the media to report “positive” news. The measures have been widely condemned by regional press freedom groups such as the Pacific Media Centre, which has talked of an “Orwellian era of ruthless censorship and intimidation.”The authorities have also targeted the international media in the capital, Suva. Reporter Sia Aston and cameraman Matt Smith of New Zealand’s TV3 and Australian Broadcasting Corporation reporter Sean Dorney were forced to leave Fiji today. While not formally arrested, they were given no choice and were escorted to the airport. The police confiscated the material that Aston had filmed on censorship. He said the Fijian media were under “very strong pressure” from the government. Edwin Nand, a journalist with the Fijian TV station Fiji One, was detained at Suva police headquarters for interviewing an Australian journalist. “The military government is heading dangerously towards a Burmese-style system in which the media are permanently subject to prior censorship and other forms of obstruction,” Reporters Without Borders said. “We appeal to the international community, especially the European Union and United Nations, to respond to this manifest desire to restrict the free flow of news and information by speaking out and firmly condemning media censorship.” Reporters Without Borders appeals to President Ratu Josefa Iloilo and Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama, the head of Fiji’s military government, to repeal measures taken on 10 April that institutionalise media censorship and violate Fiji’s international undertakings to respect the rule of law. Greg Baxter, a spokesman for the company that owns the Fiji Times, News Ltd, said: “We are at this stage making the decision not to publish anything rather than publish something that has been censored.” The newspaper’s editor, Netani Rika, and its publisher were summoned by the information ministry on 12 April and reprimanded for being “uncooperative”. It stopped printing blank pages the next day but seemed to be boycotting all political news. Asia – Pacific Two Fiji Sun editors were summoned for questioning yesterday for publishing a front-page article announcing that the daily newspaper would refuse to cover politics in protest against the censorship. An online chat forum, Sotiacentral.com, decided to close rather than let its members be censored.center_img June 2, 2021 Find out more Mongolia : RSF urges presidential candidates to voice support for press freedom Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists Tuiloma Neroni Slade, the secretary-general of the Pacific Islands Forum, said: “The curtailment of media access and freedom of speech and the disregard for judicial independence are especially worrying.” Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said Fiji had become a “military dictatorship.” New Zealand foreign minister Murray McCully said Fiji’s suspension from the Commonwealth and the Pacific Islands Forum was “inevitable”. According to the Public Emergency Regulations introduced under a 30-day state of emergency on 10 April, the secretary for information has complete control over what the news media report in Fiji. “The military government is heading dangerously towards a Burmese-style system in which the media are permanently subject to prior censorship and other forms of obstruction,” Reporters Without Borders said. June 7, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts President Iloilo suspended the constitution on 10 April and announced a “new legal order”. The next day, he reappointed the head of the armed forces, Commodore Bainimarama, as prime minister, a position Bainimarama has held since a December 2006 military coup.Since then, soldiers and information ministry personnel have taken up positions inside the print and broadcast media. Officials say their job to prevent the publication or broadcasting of reports that could cause “disorder”, “disaffection” or “public alarm” The media have been told they must “cooperate” and must not criticise the new regime or carry stories that could regarded as “incitement”. News News China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison April 14, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Prior censorship and expulsion of foreign journalists deal “mortal blow” to press freedom News The media have responded with protests. The Sunday edition of the Fiji Times was published on 12 April with pages that were completely blank except for this note: “The stories on this page could not be published due to government restrictions.”last_img read more

Strengthen your team by asking this question

first_img continue reading » Leadership is all about steering your team and organization in the right direction. You set the vision, culture, and expectations for your employees to thrive in their roles. But how often do you ask your employees how they’re doing? You likely have regular one-on-ones with direct reports, but are you intentional in making sure they have everything they need for success?David Dye, a leadership expert and author, suggests leaders ask this simple question regularly: “How can I help?”As one of my recent blogs explained, people are reluctant to ask for help for a number of reasons. By asking, “How can I help?” you’re taking some of the pressure off your employees who might be uncomfortable coming directly to you.Dye further outlines some things leaders should listen for when asking to help:Equipment and skills they need. While it can be expensive, it’s important to keep your office’s tech and training up to date. Slow computers or unorganized platforms can greatly hamper productivity. And if you want to keep your company competitive, providing employees with training that will take their skills and problem solving to the next level is imperative. Be willing to invest in these areas, and let your employees know you’re open to hearing their pitches as to why it’s needed. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Bodnar to drive PACE cut-backs

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Damen CCTV System Nominated for IADC Safety Award 2017

first_imgIADC (International Association of Dredging Companies) has just announced the 3nd IADC Safety Award 2017 nominee: Damen Shiprepair – CCTV System.In an effort to reduce the dangers to crew both inside and outside a vessel, Damen Shiprepair entrusted a CCTV-system (installed by RBC) with overseeing activities taking place in high-risk locations, including the engine, pump and turret rooms as well as confined spaces.Running 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, Damen’s linked camera surveillance, access control, gas detection, audio/visual alarm and open radio transmission system lets one person continuously monitor 20 high-risk locations all at once from a Mobile Command Unit, detecting and acting upon hazards as they arise, in real time.At the onset, hazardous situations increased significantly but with this information, Damen was able to improve the safety management system and guarantee worker’s safety.The cameras will soon be wireless, but until then needs a 220V power source and cable to connect with the central supervision unit.The system reduces operational costs by 20 to 50 per cent by requiring less static safety consultants on site.IADC Safety AwardThe Award seeks to identify the exceptional safety performance of a particular project, product, ship, team or employee.Launched in 2015, the IADC Safety Award is intended to encourage the development of safety skills on the job, rewarding people and companies demonstrating diligence in safety awareness in the performance of their profession.The IADC Board of Directors will present the winner of the Safety Award 2017 at the IADC Annual General Meeting in Marseille, France, in September 2017.last_img read more